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The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action. 
The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action. 
The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action. 
The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action. 
The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action. 
The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action. 
The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action. 
The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action. 
The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 
Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.
Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action.

The Ruins of Detroit [abandoned buildings] 

Yves Marchand & Romain Meffre

Equal parts fascinating and sad. I’m not one to get mad about “ruin porn”, in fact my good friend MoJo is a prolific poster of Detroit’s decay over on her instagram: justthemojo.

Hopefully the attention these neglected buildings receive will eventually become action.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano
Detroit - Unbroken Down
In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.
Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.
“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”
Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Dave Jordano

Detroit - Unbroken Down

In the past 40 years, the number of people living in the city of Detroit has halved. This has led many to write it off — in many ways, wrongly — as a decrepit ghost town. Unbroken Down is a photo project that counters the images of abandoned buildings with personal, vibrant shots of everyday life in Detroit.

Photographer Dave Jordano – fresh out of college after being born and raised in the Motor City – was part of the exodus when he headed for Chicago to start a commercial photography studio in the late ’70s. Jordano’s father worked for General Motors and joked that motor oil ran in the family’s veins. Three years ago, Jordano returned to Detroit and began photographing the neighborhoods, people, vistas and communities of his hometown. His resulting body of work is an endearing and sprawling document of a city close to his heart.

“This is the most emotional work I’ve made,” he says. “I don’t get tired and I just keep wanting to go back. I find more and more material every time I go.”

Unbroken Down is also an attempt to set the photographic record straight. Jordano believes that Detroit is more than a tale of decline and images of the associated urban decay. Yet, a lot of celebrated photography projects made in Detroit recently have focused on ruination as if the apocalypse passed through and kept going.

Twinpug & I and a couple other pics from our day at the Long Family Orchard in Commerce, MI
Their doughnuts had a texture similar to churros and I could not.stop.eating.them.
Oh, and hoodoceanhelium (my brother) is the photobomber. Twinpug & I and a couple other pics from our day at the Long Family Orchard in Commerce, MI
Their doughnuts had a texture similar to churros and I could not.stop.eating.them.
Oh, and hoodoceanhelium (my brother) is the photobomber. Twinpug & I and a couple other pics from our day at the Long Family Orchard in Commerce, MI
Their doughnuts had a texture similar to churros and I could not.stop.eating.them.
Oh, and hoodoceanhelium (my brother) is the photobomber.

Twinpug & I and a couple other pics from our day at the Long Family Orchard in Commerce, MI

Their doughnuts had a texture similar to churros and I could not.stop.eating.them.

Oh, and hoodoceanhelium (my brother) is the photobomber.

fastcompany:

Detroit doesn’t simply decay with time. It wrestles with decay by putting up new skyscrapers and tearing down others. Fresh strips of sidewalk were paved in front of vacant lots. Some beautiful old mansions were renovated but never quite finished. When Detroit hosted the Super Bowl in 2006, the city even tried to string festive lights on abandoned office buildings.
 “To me,” says photographer Camile Jose Vergara, “the whole story got more and more interesting as time passed, because it got more complicated.”
These two photographers captured contrasting (yet equally beautiful) images of Detroit city.
fastcompany:

Detroit doesn’t simply decay with time. It wrestles with decay by putting up new skyscrapers and tearing down others. Fresh strips of sidewalk were paved in front of vacant lots. Some beautiful old mansions were renovated but never quite finished. When Detroit hosted the Super Bowl in 2006, the city even tried to string festive lights on abandoned office buildings.
 “To me,” says photographer Camile Jose Vergara, “the whole story got more and more interesting as time passed, because it got more complicated.”
These two photographers captured contrasting (yet equally beautiful) images of Detroit city.
fastcompany:

Detroit doesn’t simply decay with time. It wrestles with decay by putting up new skyscrapers and tearing down others. Fresh strips of sidewalk were paved in front of vacant lots. Some beautiful old mansions were renovated but never quite finished. When Detroit hosted the Super Bowl in 2006, the city even tried to string festive lights on abandoned office buildings.
 “To me,” says photographer Camile Jose Vergara, “the whole story got more and more interesting as time passed, because it got more complicated.”
These two photographers captured contrasting (yet equally beautiful) images of Detroit city.
fastcompany:

Detroit doesn’t simply decay with time. It wrestles with decay by putting up new skyscrapers and tearing down others. Fresh strips of sidewalk were paved in front of vacant lots. Some beautiful old mansions were renovated but never quite finished. When Detroit hosted the Super Bowl in 2006, the city even tried to string festive lights on abandoned office buildings.
 “To me,” says photographer Camile Jose Vergara, “the whole story got more and more interesting as time passed, because it got more complicated.”
These two photographers captured contrasting (yet equally beautiful) images of Detroit city.
fastcompany:

Detroit doesn’t simply decay with time. It wrestles with decay by putting up new skyscrapers and tearing down others. Fresh strips of sidewalk were paved in front of vacant lots. Some beautiful old mansions were renovated but never quite finished. When Detroit hosted the Super Bowl in 2006, the city even tried to string festive lights on abandoned office buildings.
 “To me,” says photographer Camile Jose Vergara, “the whole story got more and more interesting as time passed, because it got more complicated.”
These two photographers captured contrasting (yet equally beautiful) images of Detroit city.

fastcompany:

Detroit doesn’t simply decay with time. It wrestles with decay by putting up new skyscrapers and tearing down others. Fresh strips of sidewalk were paved in front of vacant lots. Some beautiful old mansions were renovated but never quite finished. When Detroit hosted the Super Bowl in 2006, the city even tried to string festive lights on abandoned office buildings.

“To me,” says photographer Camile Jose Vergara, “the whole story got more and more interesting as time passed, because it got more complicated.”

These two photographers captured contrasting (yet equally beautiful) images of Detroit city.

I want this to happen to my home. Someone go make this happen to my home.

I want this to happen to my home. Someone go make this happen to my home.

Apartment Therapy suggests buying up the less expensive 12” tile and cutting it yourself. LOOKS SO GOOD.

image from decorpad